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Hays Free Press
Kyle, Texas
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March 6, 2013     Hays Free Press
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March 6, 2013
 

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+ + HaysFreePress.com CLASSIFIEDS PUBLIC NOTICES SERVICE DIRECTORY March 6, 2013 What a difference 15 years can make. While Texas Lehigh Cement Co. and CFAN are still ranked first and second in the value of proper- ties in Hays CISD, with PEC drop- ping one spot to fourth place in 15 years, most of the properties paying a large portion of the taxes for local schools were not even built - nor were they in the planning stages - 15 years ago. Some of the properties that were paying large taxes in 1998 have ei- ther gone out of business, sold off portions of their land holdings (thus dropping their property values), or simply been outpaced by larger con- struction projects in recent years. See a comparison of the Top Taxpayers from 1998 to 2013, pg. 4D BY MOSES LEOS III reach the "next level" of providing services to members. moses@haysfreepress.com "We are excited to have J.R.'s exper- tise," said BACC Chairman of the Board At the recent annual board of directors Lisa Sauceda, who looked forward to ideas retreat, the Buda Area Chamber of Corn- brainstormed during the retreat. "We are merce (BACC) hired consultant ].R. Gonza- excited for him to be here." les, who played a role as facilitator in brain- In the two-day retreat, the directors went storming new ideas and programs for area through a training process, as Gonzales as- businesses, sessed the current function of the Chamber, Gonzales, president and CEO of the in- ensuring that things were running smooth- dependent consulting firm IRG Commu- nications, was brought in to help the BACC See BUOA CONSULTANT, pg. 4D + .e more Take advantage of higher IRA contribution limits FINANCIAL FOCUS For the first time since 2008, contribution limits have risen for one of the most popular retirement savings vehi- cles available: the IRA. This means you've got a greater opportunity to put more money away for your "golden years." Effective earlier this year, you can now put in up to $5,500 (up from $5,OOO in 2012) to a tradi- tional or Roth IRA when you make your 2013 contribution. And if you're 50 or older, you can put in an additional $1,000 above the new contribution limit. Over time, the extra sums from the higher contribution limits can add up. Consider this example: If you put in $5,000 per year to an IRA for 30 years, and you earned a hypothetical 7% per year, you'd wind up with slightly over $505,000. But if you contributed $5,500 per year for those same 30 years, and earned that same 7% per year, you'd accumulate almost $556,000- about $51,000 more than with the lower contribution limit. Keep in mind that if you have invested the above amounts in a traditional, tax-deferred IRA, you'll be taxed on your withdraw- als at your ordinary income tax rate. With a Roth IRA, your con- tributions are made with after-tax funds, but your withdrawals have the potential to be tax-free - pro- vided you've had your account at least five years and don't start taking withdrawals until you're 59 years and six months old. (Not everyone is eligible to contribute to a Roth IRA, as income limits apply.) If you have an IRA, you already know its advantages. If you aren't investing in an IRA, you should be aware of these key benefits: Tax-deferred growth - A traditional IRA can provide tax- deferred growth while a Roth IRA can potentially grow tax-free, provided you meet the conditions described above. To get a sense of just how valuable these tax advan- tages are, consider this example: If you put in $5,500 per year (the new IRA maximum) for 30 years to a hypothetical investment that earned 7% a year, but on which you paid taxes every year (at the 25% tax bracket), you'd end up with slightly more than $401,000 - about $155,000 less than what you'd accumulate in an IRA. As mentioned above, you will even- tually have to pay taxes on your traditional IRA withdrawals, but by the time you do, you might be in a lower tax bracket. Further- more, depending on your income level, some of your contributions to a traditional IRA may be tax- deductible. (Roth IRA contribu- tions are not deductible.) Variety of investment options -You can invest your funds within your IRA in many types of invest- ments - stocks, bonds, certificates of deposit (CDs), U.S. Treasury se- curities and so on. In fact, within your IRA, you can create a mix of See FINANCIAL FOCUS, pg. 3D The Kyle WlC clinic, located at 150 W. Lockhart Street, is operated by the City of San Marcos. The office is open Mondays and Thursday from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., and Fridays from 8 a.m. to noon. They can be reached at 512-268-0003. PHOTO BY DAVID WHITE Wednesdays from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m., Tuesdays and Kyle's WIC program servicing 1,300 families per month BY ANDY SEVILLA andy@haysfreepress.com Since opening a Kyle office in Octo- ber 2012, the Women, Infants & Chil- dren (WIC) program now serves about 1,300 customers per month. WIC is a nutrition program that helps pregnant women, new mothers, infants and young children eat well, learn about nutrition and stay healthy. WIC provides nutrition education and counseling, nutritious foods and refer- rals to other services. The Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS), which funds the WIC program in Kyle and San Mar- cos, provides services free of charge to low-income families. The City of San Marcos operates the WIC clinics in Kyle and San Marcos. "There is a definite need in the northern 1-35 corridor of Hays County for WIC services," Hays County Pct. 2 Commissioner Mark Jones said. "Many WIC clients already find traveling a hardship, and now no longer need to arrange transportation to San Marcos." Households with incomes at or be- low 185 percent of the federal poverty income level are eligible for the free program, according to the DSHS web- site. The poverty guideline for a family of four is $23,550, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Ser- vices. For each additional person, add $4,020, according to the agency. According to the U.S. Census Bu- reau's latest statistics, Kyle has 9.2 per- cent of its population below poverty level, which translates to about 2.695 residents. By comparison, San Marcos. who also has a WIC clinic, has 35.6 percent of its population below poverty level, according to census statistics. Data also showed that Buda and Hays County's residents are at 5.9 per- cent and 16.4 percent below poverty level, respectively. DerryAnn Martinez, WIC program assistant director of community servic- es, said the "WIC clinic in the Kyle area was very much welcomed." "Studies show that WIC plays an important role in improving birth outcomes and containing health-care costs," according to the DSHS web- site. "WIC has a positive impact on children's diets. WIC improves infant- Breasffed Infants - 6 months to 11 months Infant cereal - 24 ounces Infant fruits and vegetables - 64 - 4 ounce containers Infant meats - 31 - 2.5 ounce containers Formula Fed IMaMs - 0 to 5 months Formula - amount varies Formula - 6 iimldlk to 11 moMhs Infant cereal - 24 ounces Infant fruits and vegetables - 32 - 4 ounce containers Children 12 to 23 months Milk (whole only) - 3 gallons and 1 quart Cheese- 1 pound Cereal - 36 ounces Juice (64 ounces fluid or 16 ounces frOzen- 2 containers Eggs - 1 dozen Beans - 1 pound Peanut butter - none Fruits and vegetables - $6 Whole grains - 2 pounds Children 2 years and older Milk (fat-free, 1/2%, 1% or 2%) - 3 gallons and 1 quart Cheese - 1 pound Cereal -36 ounces Juice (64 ounces fluid or 16 ounces frozen) - 2 containers Eggs - 1 dozen Beans or peanut butter - 1 pound or 18 ounces Fruits and vegetables - $6 Whole grains = 2 pounds Post Partum and Some Breastfeeding Milk (fat-free, 1/2%, 1% or 2%) - 3 gallons and 1 quart Cheese - 1 pound Cereal - 36 ounces Juice (48 ounces fluid or 12 ounces frozen) - 2 containers Eggs- 1 dozen Beans or peanut butter - 1 pound or 18 ounces Fruits and vegetables- $10 Whole grams - none Pregnant aM Mostly Breastfeeding Milk(fat-free, 1/2%, 1% or 2%)-4 1/2 gallon and 1 quart Cheese - 1 pound Cereal - 36 ounces Juice (48 ounces fluid or 12 ounces frozen) - 3 containers Eggs- 1 dozen Beans and peanut butter- 1 0ound and 18 ounces Fruits and vegetables - $10 Whole grains - 1 pound Exclusively Breastfeeding Milk (fat-free, 1/2%, 1% or 2%) - 5 gallon and 1 quart Cheese - 2 pounds Cereal - 36 ounces Juice (48 ounces fluid or 12 ounces frozen) - 3 containers Eggs- 2 dozen Beans and peanut butter - 1 pound and 18 ounces Tuna or Salmon - 30 ounces Fruits and vegetables - $10 Whole grains - 1 pound feeding practices by actively promot- ing breasffeeding as the best method of feeding infants. WIC clients have improved rates of childhood immuni- zations and a regular source of health care." Kyle's WIC clinic, at 150 W. Lockhart Street, is open Mondays and Wednes- days from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m., Tuesdays and Thursday from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., and Fridays from 8 a.m. to noon. They can be reached at 512-268-0003. LIVING BELOW POVERTY LEVEE The poverty guideline for a family Kyle 9 2% 0f four is $23,550, according to = the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. For each Buda 5.9% additional person, add $4,020, according to the agency. Co. o 16,4 J/o +.