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Hays Free Press
Kyle, Texas
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April 20, 2016     Hays Free Press
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April 20, 2016
 

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÷ Hays Free Press • April 20, 2016 Page 4A BY ANNA HEROD news@haysfreepress•com Following the lead of surrounding municipalities, Kyle City Council unanimously adopted a beautification plan brought forward by city staff at an earlier meeting. Erin Smith, a city intern who spearheaded the drafting of the plan, said its purpose is to beautify the community, along with increase desirability of real estate and encourage investment in landscaping. The beautification plan consists of seven initiatives including corridor beautification, revitalization of downtown, attractive signage and code compliance. The code compliance initiative is aimed to identify and abate code violations to improve the quality of life for the general citizenry, Smith said. Both City Manager Scott Sellers and Smith said Kyle's new beautification plan mostly formalizes steps the city has already been taking to make the community more attractive. 'And I think we're allowing that documented priority to guide future policies and future projects in a more informed capacity moving forward," Smith said. Sellers said officials hired two more code enforcement officers this year, which is "big" for the community. He said the city has only had one code enforcement officer position in its history. "That will help us beautify the city," Sellers said. "These things are really starting to evolve kind of naturally, but we wanted to make sure there was a plan that we all follow so we all have a shared vision of what Kyle needs to look like moving forward•" Although the city is not closing the door on the possibility of charging residents a beautification fee in the future, Sellers "These things are really starting to evolve kind of naturally, but we wanted to make sure there was a plan that we all follow so we all have a shared vision of what Kyle needs to look like moving forward." -Scott Sellers, Kyle City Manager The goals of this program are to; • Improve the attractiveness and utility of commercial buildings or property, in the designated downtown area. • Promotethe economic vitality of the designated downtown area. • Support and promote start-up efforts of new and/or developing businesses within the designated downtown area. • Promotethe restoration and continued maintenance of historic commercial buildings in the designated downtown area. said that for now he is very content with the plan as drafted, without a fee. However, theplan that was adopted by Kyle City Council does not include any type of fee to be paid by citizens. San Marcos and Austin pay a monthly beautification fee to help make their initiatives a reality. While residents would like the city to focus on image, Sellers said they haven't seen requests for more art or "expensive type beatification initmtlves. He said the city will "evolve (the plan) over time" and see what the "citizenry wants and expects here in Kyle." '~ good amount of initiatives that are outlined are actually already budgeted for," Smith said. "There are a number of initiatives that do not come with a cost, which is great. I would say that, with respect to next steps, it's really doing some of the leg work of identifying additional costs - should they arrive - but for the most part avoiding them at all costs and utilizing the resources that we already have available." Sellers said making Kyle more attractive would help citizens have a greater pride in their city, and make them want to stay in it while also drawing in newcomers. "Businesses, when they look to relocate, they look at whether or not the city is attractive, how their employees will feel," he said. Sellers said the adoption of the plan will help make beautification efforts more precise, since there is now a supporting document• He said it's part of a "larger holistic effort" to bring the community "where it ultimately needs to be." ' bsent the plan we won't have dollars targeted to our beautification effort, it would just continue to be haphazard," Sellers said. Smith and Sellers hope the adoption of the plan will lead to greater community involvement, as citizens will have opportunities to maintain the city through the implementation of the beautification initiatives. "We're very pleased to have the approval of city council and the adoption of this plan," Smith said. "We're looking forward to where it leads both the city and communities in Kyle in terms of making things even brighter and more beautiful than they already are." PIRE WITH ED FU LL- S E RVI CE PUBLISHING Christian Faith FIRM Hard cover and digital distribution Custom designs and illustrations Full Publicity and Promotion Campaign Your book made available at all major secular and specialty Christian bookstores PUBLIC HEARING Groundwater Management Area 10 Proposed Desired Future Conditions and Relevant Aquifer Designations Date: May 17, 2016 Time: 10:30 a.m. Location: 1101 W. San Antonio St., Lockhart, TX 78644 At an open meeting of the Groundwater Management Area 10 Joint Plan- ning Committee (GMA-10) held on March 14, 2016 in San Antonio, Texas, and attended by representatives from the following groundwater conservation districts located wholly or partially within Groundwater Management Area 10: Edwards Aquifer Authority, Medina County Groundwater Conservation District, Uvalde County Underground Water Conservation District, Plum Creek Conservation District, Barton Springs/Edwards Aquifer Conservation Dis- trict, Comal Trinity Groundwater Conservation District, and Kinney County Groundwater Conservation District; GMA-10 considered and adopted the following Proposed Desired Future Conditions (DFCs) for GMA-10 regional groundwater planning purposes: Groundwater Management Area 10 Proposed Desired Future Conditions and Relevant Aquifer Designations Austin Chalk (Uvalde County) No drawdown {including exempt and non-exempt use). Austin Chalk (Medina County) Declared non-relevant Buda Limestone (Uvalde County) No drawdown (including exempt and non-exempt use). Buda Limestone (Medina County) Declared non-relevant Edwards (BFZ) Northern Subdivision Springfiow at Barton Springs during average recharge conditions shall be no less than 49.7 cubic feet per second averaged over an 84 month {7- year) period; and during extreme drought conditions, including those as severe as a recurrence of the 1950s drought of record, springflow of Barton Springs shall be no less than 6.5 cubic feet per second averaged on a monthly basis. Edwards (BFZ) Northern Subdivision Saline Zone No more than 75 feet of regional average potentiometric surface draw- down due to pumping when compared to pre-development conditions• Edwards {BFZ) San Antonio Segment within Edwards Aquifer Authority Desired future conditions and modeled available groundwater for the Edwards Aquifer within jurisdiction of the Edwards Aquifer Authority are set by the Texas Legislature (Act of May 28, 2007, 80th Leg., R.S., ch. 1351, § § 2.02 and 2.06, 2007 Tex. Gen. Laws, 4612, 4627, and 4627; Act of May 28, 2007, 80th Leg., R.S. ch. 1430, § § 12.02 and 12.06, 2007 Tex. Gen. Laws 5848, 5901, and 5903). The DFCs are specified in Sections 1.14(a), (f), (h), and 1.26 of the Edwards Aquifer Authority Act. The DFCs are specified in Sections 1.14(a), (f), (h), and 1.26 of the Edwards Aquifer Authority Act, and relate to levels in index wells {J- 17 in the San Antonio pool and J-27 in the Uvalde pool) or flows in the Comal Springs and San Marcos Springs. Refer to theEdwards Aquifer Authority Groundwater Management Plan for details. Edwards (Kinney County.) Water level in well number sea level. 70-38-902 shall not fall below 1184 feet mean Leona Gravel (Uvalde County_) No drawdown (including exempt and non-exempt use). Leona Gravel (Medina County) Declared non-relevant (December 2, 2013) Average regional well drawdown not exceeding 25 feet during average recharge conditions (including exempt and non-exempt use); within Uvalde County: 20 feet. Members of the public are invited to attend and provide oral comment, tes- timony, and/or submit other documentation and information relevant to the Proposed DFCs and Relevant Aquifer Designations to the Board of Directors at this Public Hearing• If unable to attend the Public Hearing, members of the public are invited to submit written comments, testimony, and/or other documentation and infor- mation relevant to the Proposed DFCs and Relevant Aquifer Designations to the Board of Directors at the District Office located at: Plum Creek Conservation District EO. Box 328 1101 W. San Antonio St. Lockhart, TX 78640 GMA-10 has prepared standardized Public Comment Forms to help you orga- nize and substantiate your submission• This form is available at the address above or on our website at http: !/pccd.org/forms The Public Comment period runs from March 21, 2016 through Iune 20, 2016. The District will prepare a report of any relevant comments received at the Public Hearing and attach any written comments, testimony, and/or other documentation and information relevant to the Proposed DFCs and Relevant Aquifer Designations received through June 20, 2016. This report and attach- ments will be provided to the GMA-10 Committee for their review, consider- ation, and incorporation into the DFC decision-making process. Questions or requests for additional information may be submitted to: Daniel Meyer Plum Creek Conservation District P.O. Box 328 1101 W. San Antonio St. Lockhart, TX 78640 Tel. (512) 398 - 2383 daniel.meyer@pccd.org ÷ I I] I Ill i ] i! i i!¸ I ] I| Ii