Newspaper Archive of
Hays Free Press
Kyle, Texas
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May 24, 2017     Hays Free Press
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Page 2A NEWS Hays Free Press * May 24, 2017 + The Hays Free Press (USPS 361-430) published weekly by Barton Publications, Inc., Re. Box 339, Buda, TX 7"8610. Periodicals postage paid at Buda, TX 78610 and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Barton Publications, Inc., Re. Box 339, Buda, TX 78610. ISSN#1087-9323 NEWS TIPS If you think it's news, we probably do too! Newsroom phone: 512-268-7862 E-mail: news@haysfreepress.com Mail: 113 W. Center Street, Kyle, TX 78640 CORRECTIONS Any erroneous reflection upon the character, standing or reputation _ of any person, firm or corporation which may appear in the pages of the Hays Free Press will be corrected upon being brought to the attention of the publisher. DEADLINES The deadline for display advertising and any contributed news copy in the Hays Free Press is 5 p.m. Friday the week prior to publication. The deadline for Letters to the Editor and classified word advertising in the Hays Free Press is noon Monday the week of publication, though we encourage readers and advertisers to observe the Friday deadline. LETTERS GUIDELINES We welcome locally written letters to the editor on timely topics of community interest. We ask that you keep them to about 350 words in length and that you not indulge in personal attacks on private individuals. Letters may be edited for brevity and clarity. All letters should be signed by the author and include a daytime phone number where the author can be contacted for verification. Letter writers are limited to one letter per month. Letters can be emailed to csb@haysfreepress.com. HISTORY Founded April 10, 1903, by Thomas Fletcher Harwell as The Kyle News, with offices on the corner of Burleson and Miller streets in the town's oldest remaining building. It merged into The Hays County Citizen in 1956. The paper consolidated with The Free Press in October, 1978. During its more than 100-year history the newspaper has maintained offices at more than a dozen locations in Kyle and Buda. BY MOSES LEOS III Authorities have arrested a man they suspect was the driver of a vehicle used in a fatal April 2016 drive-by shooting in the Post Oak subdivision. Rickson Correa-Cher- em, 18, of San Marcos, was arrested by Kyle Police and was charged with first-degree murder in the shooting death of Natanaell Bardales, of Kyle, according to a city of Kyle press release. Cherem is one of two men CORREA who have -CHEREM been charged with murder in the death of Bardales. lamez Gabriel Sanchez, of Kyle, was arrested and charged with murder the day of the shooting on April 2, 2016. Sanchez, who was 16 at the time of his arrest, was originally not identified by authorities and was booked into the Hays County Juvenile Detention Facility. He was later booked into the Hays County Jail on one count of murder on his 17th birthday in August 2016. Sanchez was released on $100,000 bond at the time. Pedro Hernandez, Kyle Police captain, said authorities continued their investigation even after Sanchez had been arrested. Hemandez said authorities knew from the day of the shooting Cherem was the driver of the vehicle, and that he had been cooperative with authorities. "During the course of the investigation, we learned more information that led us to believe he had more knowledge of what occurred that day," Hernandez said. However, Hemandez could not provide additional details as the investigation is ongoing. in BY MOSES LEOS III Numerous law enforcement vehicles lined the normally quiet Steeplechase subdivision streets in Kyle to de- escalate an emergency situation last week. Kyle Police, San "When you roll out SWAT, you get the full team, because that's how they train." -Jeff Barnett, Kyle Police Officer information officer, said SWAT, as well as conflict criteria gathered at the negotiators, who go Marcos Police, the Hays scene leads to whether hand-in-hand with the County Sheriff's Office additional units or SWAT special unit. and the Hays County are needed. "(The commander) SpecialWeapons and Gutierrez said Hays takes a risk assessment Tactical (SWAT) unit County's SWAT team and what the call is were on scene for what primarily responds toabout, and makes was reported as a welfare felony calls. However, the a determination," concern in the 100 block unit can be dispatched Gutierrez said. of Casper Cove. to "very isolated andThe criteria are While the incident specific calls" that border used whenever a law was resolved safely and between a felony or enforcement entity no one was injured, the misdemeanor violation, requests SWAT. The event led to the closure Hays County's SWAT department also uses of several streets in the team consists of law those criteria when neighborhood, as well as enforcement officers dealing with situations the lockout of Lehmanfrom across the county, that require a judgment High and Chapa Middleincluding the sheriff's call, such as a suicidal schools, office, San Marcos, Kyle subject. For some, the question and Buda and the Texas "It's our responsibility of what leads law State University police, to protect that person's enforcement to call for Whenever a situation life, as well as those who SWAT and additional develops, Hays County's may be in the area," forces lingers whenever SWAT commander Gutierrez said. such events take place, determines if a greater Jeff Barnett, Kyle Dennis Gutierrez, response is needed. That Police chief, said the HCSO public could entail the use of department dispatches SWAT for a variety of situations where specialized equipment and expertise is needed. Examples would include executing high- risk search warrants, when officers believe there could be an increased risk of harm, as well as barricaded persons, primarily those who are reported to have weapons, active shooter events, prison or jail escapes or felony crimes that are in progress. Barnett said the department calls out SWAT units approximately three to five times per year.. However, SWAT units in Kyle are only deployed two to three times per year because situations get resolved before the unit arrives on the scene. "SWAT can be called due to their specialized training and equipment that they're afforded to resolve or investigate a certain task," Barnett asid. Police also can call upon SWAT for the assistance of a negotiator, or observation specialists to assist, depending on what a situation calls for. "When you roll out SWAT, you get the full team, because that's how they train," Barnett said. While Barnett understood a show of force could escalate the nervousness of residents, he said authorities can't forget about officer safety and the safety of the community. He said using resources and personnel to allow "the best opportunity to resolve a situation" without injury is the goal. "People may not have all the facts and maybe it's not for them to know all the facts for a call," Barnett said. "They need to realize law enforcement agencies try to do things in the safest manner possible." PEC: Allegations of intimidation fly at co-op Continued from pg. 1A Roberts, vice president of communications and business services at PEC, said Hewa has not resigned and remains as CEO of the company. However, Clemsen-Roberts said PEC does not comment on personnel issues. In November 2016, Oakley, who is a Burnet County Judge and a PEC board director, posted on Facebook "Time for a tree and a rope," following the arrest of a black man who was suspected of killing a San Antonio police officer in the line of duty. In January, Oakley was issued a warning by PEC board members and was stripped of his vice president position as a result of the comments, but was not removed from the dais, In January, Oakley was issued a warning by PEC board members and was stripped of his vice president position as a result of the comments, but was not removed from the dais, according to a report in the Daily Tribune in Marble Falls according to a report the racially insensitive in the Daily Tribune in comments were Marble Falls. "assured by this board, Earlier this month, in resolution, that a state judicial board retaliation would not publicly reprimanded occur." Oakley for the "Unfortunately, this comments and required has not been the case, him to complete a as far as the board of 30-hour education directors is concerned," program, as well as Hewa said. sensitivity training. But controversy Hewa said May 15 swirled as Emily Pataki, those who spoke up PEC board president, to support minority interrupted Hewa's employees and object to comment May 15 and said the comments could put "the co-op in a liable condition." The move drew consternation from those in attendance, who felt the move was to censure Hewa. During public comment May 15, PEC member Tom Mitchell said that for Pataki to "censor (Hewa) during the midst of his presentation is a travesty and outrageous." Mitchell also referenced Oakley's reprimand and said that his "behavior is unconstitutional" and the board "allowed it to continue." "This board ought to be ashamed of itself," Mitchell said. "Now I understand the rumors. I've heard the board of directors are lawyering up. I think you'd better." Marian Boyd offered Oakley "training" she gives to peace officers "on how not to racially profile a human," during her public comment. "When you hurt another person, you hurt the entire community, but most of all, you hurt yourself," Boyd said. "That being said, we're going to do everything to help you. Look at this mess you created." Amy Mohlberg was concerned the alleged actions "sounds like we're going back to the PEC of the old days." "I hope the word gets out that the board is not trying to go back to the old days of secret behavior and not caring what some members think," Mohlber said. Baja is a 5-1/2-year-old shorthair tabby female who enjoys the finer things in life: sleeping, eating, and sunbathing. Despite Baja's relaxed disposi- tion, she's actually a warrior fighting (and winning) against her Stage 2 kidney disease diagnosis. China is an 8-year-old curious and independent female Chinese Shar-Pei who's searching for a forever home to spend her golden years in. If you like cuddles after a day of exploring and looking for clues, China is the dog for you. PAWS Shelter and Humane Society is a non-profit, no-kill shelter operated primarily on donations and adoptions. 500 FM 150 E, Kyle, TX 512 268-1611 pawsshelter.org All animals are fully vaccinated, spay/neutered, microchipped and dewormed. -7