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Kyle, Texas
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August 16, 2017     Hays Free Press
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Library hosts first Great Kyle Bake-Off. - Page 1D ~: HaysFreePress.com ~a~ c~re ~ress August 16, 2017 Page 1C "It's the adage that you can't save all the starfish beached on the seashore, but if you try throwing them back one at a time, you can make a dent in the system." --Steve Fournier executive director at the Burke Center BY SAMANTHA SMITH Expanding to 31 acres was all that was needed for the Burke Center for Youth in Driftwood to continue helping at-risk boys prepare for adult life. With the addition'of two transitional homes, the Burke Center hopes to help boys aged 18 to 22 learn the skills need- ed to succeed beyond the foster system. Steve Fournier, ex- ecutive director at the Burke Center, said the expansion continues the mission of the treatment center, a 501 (c) (3) non- profit that opened in 1975, which helps boys cope with past trauma. "It's the adage that you can't save all the starfish beached on the seashore, but if you try throwing them back one at a time, you can make a dent in the system," Foumier said. Fournier said Rose- mary Burke and Charlie Campise created the center "to help the most lost child in society. It was deemed that adolescent boys from the ages of 11 to 17 would be the focus of the center. "These are boys from the foster system that have been neglected, abused and have had some major traumas in their past and they're straggling to make it work in a foster home or an adopted situation," Fournier said. Fournier said the Burke Center helps boys from all over the state. / l,! PHOTO COURTESY OF 1HE BURKE CENTER With the addition of two transitional homes, the Burke Center hopes to help boys aged 18 to 22learn the skills needed to succeed beyond the foster system. Those living in Drift- pediatric psychiatrist." Fournier said boys at the center can stay for any length of time and said some boys are at the center for nine months to a year and a half. Boys at the Burke Center attend school on-site with the Uni- versity of Texas Charter School. "LIT has done a really good job and helps them (students at Burke Cen- ter) catch up and some- . times surpass other kids their age when they are getting help here," Fournier said. Fournier said the center saw a great need for boys who turned 18 and were pushed out of the state foster system to live on their own. Most of them lacked the skills needed to thrive and prosper in society. "What we saw was a disconnect when the kids turn 18 and they BURKE FOUNDATION, 4C wood at the 24-hour residential treatment center receive therapy and treatment necessary to develop coping skills that help them adapt to less restrictive environ- ments. "We have 24-hour care for the boys," Fournier said. "We have five therapists in areas like mindfulness, drug addiction, sexual issues, anger management, an equine therapist and a Bat-faced Cuphea is a top choice for smaller plant beds and Iowerplantings. for the hot months of . summer by Amanda Moon W~arw, we have been m this sum- er! I am thank- ful for the recent rain for sure, but I am also certain that there's more heat on its way- so this seems like a good time to ask which plants can take the heat and brighten up our landscapes this time of year. There are plenty actually: Driving around town this month it's hard to miss the bright yellow blooms of the Esperanza (aka Yellow Bells, also IT'S ABOUT THYME, 2C www.skyhighshoot org/events/hur~t4or-a-cure-concert ~Kl,,~ ~ , ~]PJK~I~'I~~,e/~- Conserve. Hunt. Share. Mic hae~ 5house 04 (,5 :,~ 2) 9 6d- 9 5 :39 or mshou>;e@rtwff , r?e~: .,~ ................. ~km~ e~m :. Sky High is a nonprofit organization whose mission is to provide comfort, fund research and save lives of children diagnosed with cancer. The Sky High Adventures program was created to give pediatric cancer patients and their familiesa once in a lifetime outdoor adventure. Adventuie trips include overnight hunting, fishing and 'J~ other outdoor activities across the country. We need your help to fund the travel, special care and other expenses associated with these life-changing triPs! For more information, visit www.skyhighshoot.org. :, Saving Kids. Healing Families. + , |II I ii I