Newspaper Archive of
Hays Free Press
Kyle, Texas
Lyft
August 17, 2011     Hays Free Press
PAGE 13     (13 of 16 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 13     (13 of 16 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
August 17, 2011
 

Newspaper Archive of Hays Free Press produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2019. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




Hays Free Press August 17, 2011 NrdGIIBBM Page 3C + Forced to choose between the federal government, which Eept him in power with thousands of troops, and the people of Texas, who would vote him out of of-, rice when given the chance, Edmund 1. Davis decided'to Bartee Halle please his sponsors by letting two Kiowa war chiefs out of prison onAug. 19, 1873. The public outcry against the release of Satanta and Big Tree less than two years into their life sentences was not limited to Texans, who already had reason enough to hate the Reconstruction Republican. Gen. William T. Sherman, responsible for the arrest and imprisonment of the raiders, predicteff a new round of Kiowa bloodletting in an angry letter to Davis and expressed his fervent wish that the first scalp taken would be the governor's. By the Civil War, most In- dian tribes had been annihi- lated or expelled from Texas. The fierce exceptions were grisly scene provoked him to free the Kiowas in exchange , ride right across the Red River for peace, ignoring the price to confront the Kiowas. Texans would pay for their After Santank proudly ad- generosity. mitted responsibility for the Legally Grant could not de- atrocity, the livid general or- mand the prisoners' release, dered the arrest of the three but he did make his wishes Panhandle, where the buffalo would be a protected species. But it was up to the army only with the permission of to enforce the treaty, and their agent, and none had both Sherman and his supe- ever obliged. But the Kiowa riot, Gem Philip Sheridan, agent, evidently eager to be were dead-set against playing Tame warden. Sherman, in tact, openly advocated the destruction of the bison herds, which he described as "the Indians' commissary." The military deliberately ignored the Medicine Lodge agreement and allowed hun- dreds of hunters access to the High Plains. Meanwhile, the Kiowas enjoyed the best of both worlds. Winter was spent in the Indian Territory, where chiefs and their immediate extradition to Texas. Un- der federal law, reservation Indians were subject to arrest rid of the renegades, gave his approval. Santank sensed what lay ahead and on the trail made a suicidal break for freedom. Guards granted his death wish by shooting him on the spot. Sherman delivered Sa- tanta and Big Tree to the civil authorities at hcksboro. The July 1871 trial attracted national attention and severe criticism. Six short years after the Civil War, Indians were much more popular up north than Texans. ~oOVemment agents provided od, shelter and other ne- known. Facing certain defeat in the fall elections, Gov. Davis planned to ask for even more troops to stay in office and was, therefore, eager to please. After only 23 months behind bars, Satanta and Big Tree were turned loose in August 1873. Satanta wasted no time in resuming his raiding ways, and by. the next October was again m army custody. Sheri- dan gladly shipped him back to Huntsville. The Kiowa faced indefinite incarceration with Davis and the Radical Republicans out of power. Satanta sliced his wrists but was saved from death and placed in the sec- ond-floor infirmary. On Oct. 11, 1878, he jumped from an open window, landed head the Comanches and Kiowas, masters of the western half of ces'Mties. With warm weather the state who intimidated the tide of white settlement. Taking advantage of the chaos following the col- reservation. lapse of the Confederacy, A Kiowa band led by San- the warriors ran amuck and tank, Big Tree and Satanta succeeded in depopulat- observed this springtime rit- ing entire areas. By 1870 the frontier was in danger of be- ing rolled=all the way back to Fort Worth, Waco, Austin and San Antonio. In the 1867 Treaty of Medicine Lodge, Washington promised the Plains Indians the moon. The pact guar- anteed the nomads a vast sanctuary south of the Arkan- sas River, including the Texas The trial was in truth a sham affair with the out- the rested Indians ravaged come never in doubt. The northwestern Texas and scur- jury returned a guilty verdict fled back to the safety of the and condemned the Kiowas ual in 1871 spreading terror throughout Young and lack counties. In a May 18 attack on a wagon train between Jacksboro and Fort Griffin, a half dozen teamsters were killed, and one helpless vic- tim was roasted to death over an open fire. Sherman was nearby on an inspection tour and personally visited the massacre site. The to death on the gallows. But Davis bowed to pressure from President Grant, the Bureau of Indian Affairs and the eastern press and com- muted the sentences to life imprisonment. A year later, the worried president requested the appearance of Satanta and Big Tree at a conference in St. Louis with the Southern Plains tribes. To Texans' indignant amazement, Davis again complied. At the parley, federal negotiators offered to first in the stone courtyard and died on impact. Big Tree took a dramati- cally different path, choos- ing religion over revenge. He helped to found a Baptist mission among the Kiowas and was a prominent propo- nent of peaceful coexistence with the whites until his death in 1929. Bartee Haile welcomes your comments, questions and suggestions at HYPER- LlNK "mailto:haile@pdq. nef'haile@pdq, net or P.O. Box 152, Friendswood, TX 77549. Come on by www.twith.com for a uisit and follow Bartee on Facebook. ADWARE SPYWARE MALWARE VIRUSES On-Site Removal (requires broadband intemet access) o Norton laternet Security and Anti-Virus 2010 Mfr. Rebates Available to Previous Owners 468-4451 Open Every day 295-6008 A nT continues to be quite for gardeners ers, and pretty much everyone else in this land without rain. However last Saturday brought with it a mini 97 degree cool wave- and for me it brought a sense ofhope. I noticed a little spting in my step as I went abont my chores at the nursery- and I realized that we am almost halfway through August... and Just around the comer lies a new season. The last week of this month s~na~ the planting season I for all of our wonderful fall vegetables. The brassicas can be planted from this week to the end of October. This family includes broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, turnips, collard and mustard greens, kohlrabi, and Brussels sprouts. There is still time to pull offa t gl lS growing palms with taller ones in the back uncL The Mediterranean fan pain for example, grows fairly dose to the ground (to 10 feet) and de- velops a nice wide canopy. You can place these in a row dose to the pool, with tall growing windmili palms behind them. Other talipalms to choose from are the Washingtonia, Phoenix and Pindo palmg Sagos could be planted to add interest to areas dose to the ground. A tall duster of green and red bananas would provide fall tomato and pepper crop ff colorful forage as a back drop. you go with transplants instead Another useful family is the of seed. conifers. My favorite at the There's also enough time to plant snap beans, cucumbers, and summer squash from transplants or seed. Starting in September we can plant radish, carrots and Swiss chard. Lettuce and spin- ach varieties can be planted by mid-month. moment is the glorious Arizona blue ice cypress. This conifer reeches a height of 12 feet and spreads 6 to 8 feet wide. Planted on 8 foot centem, they can grow into a dense screen. Another good choice is the blue point juniper. These can easily grow to a height of 10 feet For those gazdeners who miss with a 6 tD 7 foot spread. Both gzo~ spinach during the hot of these varieties flourish in our summer months, them is a lp'eat centralTexas are~ little vine called Malabar spin- lfyou want go native and ach (Basella aIba) that is easy to evergreen, try yaupon holly, grow and loves warm weatheL southem waxmyrtleor Texas Although not taxonomically mountain laureL They are related to spinach, its leaves am rela~-ely f~t-gmwin~ and can a tasty substitute. ORen called make it through our summers. md spinach or creeping spinach, For a tall screen, plant live this fast growing vine is rich in vitandnA and C, iron and caldum_ It's lowin calories, high in fiber, and can be eaten raw as a leafy green in salads, steamed, wilted or used in soups, Please water your trees. On the way to work, I see the truly sad effects of the drought and heat. Too many of our native trees am shedding their leaves early to survive. What's tragic is that many won't make R to next spring without much needed rain. Some time ago Hays Free Press reader John Messenger wrote in asking for advice about plants that would create a sense of privacy around his swimn _g pool. Let's assume the pool is in a sunnylocation. Sun-hardy evergreens come to mind. Ifyou want a tropical look, mix low- oaks or Mexican white oaks. Put them along a fence ime or property edge, and these will create dramatic evergreen screens in the 10 to 30 foot range.., enough to block out a two-story neighbor. Evergreen vines on a trellis am another idea. Tangerine beauty crossvine, Texas coral honey- suckle, confederate jasmine and carolina Jessamine all work well, and will create a dense screen, provide seasonal color, and attract the occasional butterfly andhumm b Happy gardening everyone! Ifyou haue a question, send it to me via emag. iathyme@ yahoacora. (Ph e put Y, sk Chris Windou/ in the subject line.) Or mail your letter or postcard to: Ask (~aris Wmslom It's About Thyme: l1726 Manchaca Road, Austin, TX78748 um~.itsabout- Texas Crossword and Sudoku sponsored by J See Solution, page 6C ACROSS 1 Boeme newspaper 5 Houston about Austin's death: ~The rather of Texas more" ,6 college-based militap/program 7 Kinney Co. was named for this parson (inR.) 8 TXisrn: "useless as eardngs on a ___" 9 song: The ___.__ Rose of Texas" 15 Santa ____, TX 16 Coleman's Warbird Museum has planes of this fight (2 wds.) 19 this Skip wrote =God's Coach" about Tom Landry 21 Kevin of film =Violets Are Blue" with TX Sissy Spacek 22 new company 27 TXism: "a day ---, and a dollar ~/tlorP 28 vandalizing a car , by scratching 29 Houston dance stud (2 wds.) 30 TXism: `fiery funeral" 32 this Ed was =Mingo" when TX Fess was "Daniel" (init.) 33 concert amphttheatre, The Woodlands, TX 36 ailments 37 TX opera composer Roddguez (init,) 38 TX Dixie Chicks '93 album: ~Shouldn't a ~-- ~ That" 39 most NBA players 41 TXism: "went to the well once .--- often" 42 ~ States 45 TXism: "two peas in _ ___" (alike) 46 Stars box score abbr. for a goel with no goel 47 between "ones" & "threes" 48 a perfect performance by TX golden gymnast Cady Patterson 49 24 I 38 "let me of advice" 52 pornography 53 Suparrnen's biological mother 54 junior naval officer 11 (abbr.) 55 TX-bom president =lke* (init,) 12 DOWN 1 respectful reply to a 13 man: "Yes ..__" 2 TX optical co. (abbr.) 14 3 *A" inA.F. Lucas, eady TX ollrnen15 4 with 147 square miles, It's the small- est in TX (2 wds.) 16 8 TXIsm: "he's still got some ---- in his 17 gaders" 9" __ Bugs Bunny" 18 10 TXIsm:'let' dpF 20 TX-bom Lucille Fay __Sueur was Joan Crewford m~Wab~ pond? (2 wds.) TX Roy Orbison's __ the Lona f TX Audie Murphy was a hero in this war TXism; "mean as _______ on a gunpowder dlst" Corpus Christi FM, before it was KMXR in 1845, Republic of TX was to U.S.A. "hold in high get money for labor 22 Elvis' pos. on the Rangers (abbr.) 23 TX boogie rock band: "ZZ _" 24 TXism: "fast as ___ up a rafter"- 25 a second ballot 26 "Pin the ____ __ the Donkey" 28 in Tyler, 93.t FM See Solution, page 6C & Guy Orbison 17 18 P-1024 ~1 "whippersnapper" (2 wds.) :34 Loretta of '49 film =The Accused' with T Ann Doran (init.) :35 informal promise to pay a debt (abbr.) 37 this Afledge createc Monday pro football 40 oil-producers org. 43 TX Harlon Block was 1 of the 6 ___ Jima flag misers 44 disheveled hair 50 woman's handbag 51 TXism: =call day" + BJ~jj~j~jj~ ...................... Jll~ II1~1 It| i Fllm IIIJff111 h~l*lllmllnnltJdm~daal~' ~'*r r'" ...........